Physicists Send Particles Of Light Into The Past, Proving Time Travel Is Possible


Single particles of light (photons) to simulate quantum particles travelling through time were just used by scientists from the University of Queensland, Australia. They showed that one photon can pass through a wormhole and then interact with its older self.

The study of closed time like curves (CTC’s) provides valuable insight into particles that can loop back on themselves, breaking free of linear time.


“One aspect of general relativity that has long intrigued physicists is the relative ease with which one can find solutions to Einstein’s field equations that contain closed timelike curves (CTCs)—causal loops in space–time that return to the same point in space and time.”

The Science

Closed timelike curves are a necessary concept to understand this experiment.

CTCs are used to simulate powerful gravitational fields, like the ones produced by a spinning black hole, that could theoretically (based on Einstein’s theory of general relativity), warp the fabric of existence so that space-time bends back on itself. This creates a CTC, almost like a pathway to travel back through time.

The source of time travel speculation lies in the fact that our best physical theories seem to contain no prohibitions on traveling backward through time. The feat should be possible based on Einstein’s theory of general relativity, which describes gravity as the warping of spacetime by energy and matter. An extremely powerful gravitational field, such as that produced by a spinning black hole, could in principle profoundly warp the fabric of existence so that spacetime bends back on itself. This would create a “closed timelike curve,” or CTC, a loop that could be traversed to travel back in time. (source)

Experimenting With CTC’s

Single particles of light (photons) to simulate quantum particles travelling through time were just used by scientists from the University of Queensland, Australia. They showed that one photon can pass through a wormhole and then interact with its older self. Their findings were published in Nature Communications. 

Much of their simulation revolved around investigating the “grandfather paradox,” a hypothetical scenario in which someone uses a CTC to travel back through time to murder her own grandfather, thus preventing her own later birth.

The Grandfather Paradox in Quantum Physics

Instead of a human being traversing a CTC to kill her ancestor, imagine that a fundamental particle goes back in time to flip a switch on the particle-generating machine that created it. If the particle flips the switch, the machine emits a particle—the particle—back into the CTC; if the switch isn’t flipped, the machine emits nothing.

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New Mind-blowing Experiment Confirms That Reality Doesn’t Exist If You Are Not Looking at It


According to a well-known theory in quantum physics, a particle’s behavior changes depending on whether there is an observer or not. It basically suggests that reality is a kind of illusion and exists only when we are looking at it. Numerous quantum experiments were conducted in the past and showed that this indeed might be the case.

Now, physicists at the Australian National University have found further evidence for the illusory nature of reality. They recreated the John Wheeler’s delayed-choice experiment and confirmed that reality doesn’t exist until it is measured, at least on the atomic scale.

Thought-provoking findings

Some particles, such as photons or electrons, can behave both as particles and as waves. Here comes a question of what exactly makes a photon or an electron act either as a particle or a wave. This is what Wheeler’s experiment asks: at what point does an object ‘decide’?

The results of the Australian scientists’ experiment, which were published in the journal Nature Physics, show that this choice is determined by the way the object is measured, which is in accordance with what quantum theory predicts.

It proves that measurement is everything. At the quantum level, reality does not exist if you are not looking at it,” said lead researcher Dr. Andrew Truscott in a press release.

The experiment

The original version of John Wheeler’s experiment proposed in 1978 involved light beams being bounced by mirrors. However, it was difficult to implement it and get any conclusive results due to the level of technological progress back then. Now, it became possible to successfully recreate the experiment by using helium atoms scattered by laser light.

Dr. Truscott’s team forced a hundred of helium atoms into a state of matter called Bose-Einstein condensate. After this, they ejected all the atoms until there was only one left.

Then, the researchers used a pair of laser beams to create a grating pattern, which would scatter an atom passing through it just like a solid grating scatters light. Thus, the atom would either act as a particle and pass through one arm or act as a wave and pass through both arms.

Thanks to a random number generator, a second grating was then randomly added in order to recombine the paths. This was done only after the atom had already passed the first grate.

As a result, the addition of the second grating caused interference in the measurement, showing that the atom had traveled both paths, thus behaving like a wave. At the same time, when the second grating was not added, there was no interference and the atom appeared to have traveled only one path.

The results and their interpretation

As the second grating was added only after the atom had passed through the first one, it would be reasonable to suggest that the atom hadn’t yet ‘decided’ whether it was a particle or a wave before the second measurement.

According to Dr. Truscott, there may be two possible interpretations of these results. Either the atom ‘decided’ how to behave based on the measurement or a future measurement affected the photon’s past.

The atoms did not travel from A to B. It was only when they were measured at the end of the journey that their wave-like or particle-like behavior was brought into existence,” he said.

Thus, this experiment adds to the validity of the quantum theory and provides new evidence to the idea that reality doesn’t exist without an observer. Perhaps further research in the field of quantum physics and more thought-provoking evidence like this will completely change our understanding of reality one day.

“If quantum mechanics hasn’t profoundly shocked you, you haven’t understood it yet.”
~Niels Bohr

My personal OBE (out of body) experiences


OBE ( out of body experiance )

out of body experiance

Many asked me to write about my personal experience with OBE ( out of body experience ) so here it is 🙂

First I would like to say that I did it for experiment and to prove, we all have souls and there is life beyond our physical experience. Though I believe in the spiritual world, I am very skeptical in my nature so I must verify anything that interest me and not just believe it.

So with this in mind, I red about OBE in the late 90’s, red about it but never had time to try it, when I moved to Canada in 1997, I had more time to explore the esoteric information, so I started to read a lot about this, include original Kabbalah books in Hebrew and Aramaic, Hebrew is my native language but I had to learn Aramaic to read some of the books and so I did, reading the old Kabbalah books in its original source, gave me lot of insights, that I could never get in any other way, it’s hard to explain the experience to someone who didn’t try it but it is like someone is talking to you in your own life level, in away you can understand the spiritual dimensions, in your own eyes. In later times when I reread the same text from the Zohar ( the main Kabbalah book ) for example, I could understand more things, so those books are written in the language of symbolism, as it is the language of the souls, like in dreams each one will understand his dreams with his own symbolism.

Me in my front home garden in Canada

Me in my front home garden in Canada

I didn’t just read kabbalah books, I read almost all the main religious books as the Torah, the Jewish bible and the Christian bible, the Quran and Hadith as well as few non canonical books, buddhists and hinduism books as well. there is fine line connecting all the religions. I found out they all talk about love but teaching fear, the fear of death and after life, if you are a sinner in this life. So this was a very strong trigger to get me out of the books, into this spiritual world my self, yes I can’t forget the fear I had, but the curiosity was stronger, and so I went and looked into all the different methods to find out by my self, how to get out of my body. I didn’t wished to have NDE ( near death experience ) for this 😉 so for me OBE was the only real way to do it.

There are few methods that I tried but I will not go into this, as it didn’t worked out for me and was totally losing time. What I will explain is the only way I was able to do it.

So here it is: First I was able to do it only in the mornings, after good night sleeping ( other way you simply fall to sleep ) and in total relaxed and soundless room, my bed room was perfect for it when all was closed and no one was at home, I was working from my home when I lived in Canada ( website designer freelancer ) so I could find some time in the morning for this experiments.

So how my OBE was done?

When you are in total relaxed room with no sounds you lay on the bed and then start relaxing all your body, and I mean all ! From the fingers of your legs up to your ears every muscle must be in total relax, even the mouth should be left open you should be like a dead person, just breathing slowly and deeply and feel nothing, this take like 15 to 20 minutes to achieve.

When you are in this situation, you should start empty your mind, clean and block any thought that will pop up… this is even harder to do… but possible, with training you must get into total emptiness of your mind, with total relaxed body. This may take another 15 to 20 minutes.

If you passed those 2 stages, you will start feel vibrations and noise inside your brain, its like from your ears but its not, its inside your brain, wissel and vibrations like electricity between your ears, you should not go into panic and stay with it for 5 to 10 minutes, again without thinking or moving your body…

If you can do this part, you are ready to get out…

My first time, when I got out, was when I lay down and then lifted my self as if I would lift my self to sit on the bed, but I did it strongly and flipped over hitting the ventilator over my bed, while I was flipped ( if you imagine it ) I was able to see my body on the bed but looking from the legs side, I got really panicked from this, if someone had ever death fear, when your body frost and your face become all white, it is how I felt. I was sure I just died… and so I start swimming back into my body and woke up jumping and sitting on my bed all wet from cold sweat. It was the most frightening experience of my life so far.. I must admit..

How ever this got me the answers I needed, that I do have a soul and there is some sort of life out of the body…
My next experience took lot of time to achieve, noises, nerves, phone calls, all kind of disturbing events, prevent me to get into the vibrations mode, but eventually I was able to get it… however this time I didn’t want to hit the vent again, so I decide to flip over to the floor… and it is exactly what happened, I flipped but did not stay on the floor, I went inside, deep into the ground… it was dark and I could smell and taste the soil the rotten trees parts, it wasn’t good smell or atmosphere and I didn’t want to be stuck in it, so I try to get out, but this woke me up. So this experience taught me that we can pass matter while we are out of the body and we do feel smell and taste… even stronger than inside the body…

In my third experiment, I wanted from start to prove that I am not dreaming or have illusions, so I decided in advance, I’ll get out of the house and look to the cars numbers parking out side and will try to remember at least one car number, while I’m out of my body, then to go out and verify it, and so it is exactly what I did, this time I delicately got up for not jump to far, after I was in the vibrational stage, and was able to actually walk out vie the wall fall/fly down ( my bed room was in the second level ) and walk/fly in the street to a black car on the other side of the street, I think it was Honda or Acura I saw the symbol from the back and I looked at the number of the car, but couldn’t remember all, so I memorised only the 4 last numbers and simply decided to wake up, and on the spot, I was back in my bed with open eyes… I immediately got out home almost sliding down the stairs and in no time I was on the other side of the street looking at the black car 4 last numbers, indeed I knew them…

Well this was the ultimate proof I needed , I knew I wasn’t dreaming or imagining anything of it, this is total fact, there is life out of our body more over our memories aren’t in our brain… and we can fly…

Again took me few weeks to achieve the fourth OBE, mainly because of stress, this last event, totally changed my own perspectives about life, I wasn’t afraid any more about death, but actually was very afraid about the life it self.. If there is after life, then why we are in life ? Ok I knew from the religious books they all talk about it, we need to be good, but nothing in the experiments I did, point into this, there was simply life out of the body.. I had to go deeper or far inside this other side… and one cold morning ( about 6 months after my first attempt ) while under my blanket, I did it, I decide that this time, I’ll go far as I can to find out what is it really out there… So this time after around 10 minutes of vibrations and strong whistling sound in my brain, I didn’t just got out I jumped out of my body, up and out to the air via the roof, I went high maybe 100 meters up in the air and could see the houses down but then I flipped and looked up and was shocked to see light not the normal sky I used to see, it was strong warm light but not the sunlight, totally other thing, I kept moving into it flying upper and then started feeling Love, strong feeling of love, I had never felt in my life such feeling, it was love feeling that noone can feel in life and its took me like a magnet I wanted to be part of it, but then I was able to see something dark coming fast from the right side, I stopped and was afraid to look at it, but could see from the side of my eyes like a dark man shape, just beside me and this thing, communicated with me this ” stop don’t move any more and don’t ever try it again, if you wish to live, you are not ready yet ” immediately after I was back in my bed under my blanket, shaking like a baby… This was another shocking event that I’ll never forget… and it taught me more, I now knew there is LOVE force surrounding earth and there are angels or what ever you may call it, that guard it and us, from go into this place, if it isnt our time. So from this I knew what we have to do while we are in life, cause I was so nothing over there beside that enormous love force and understood that I wasn’t good enough, to be in such environment, I must be a better person, much much better…

After this experience, I never tried OBE again, cause I want to live and become the best I can be, before I’ll pass into this spiritual world. This event totally changed me and I kept on learning everything I could, about the spiritual world and kept trying till this day to find ways for verify the information, indeed there are many belief systems and it is hard to come up with “scientific” methods to prove them but I did try to find ways and till today it is now over 17 years I am doing it, while concentrating on one particular field – LOVE… and on this I’ll write in another article 🙂 thank you for reading this and I hope it may help those who need proves ( as me ) that we all do have souls and there is life out of our body and after we die we go there for sure.. and yes the power outside earth is LOVE unconditional LOVE…

I wrote a website about the angels and the spiritual world if you wish to learn more http://GuideAngel.com

Feel free to contact me about this subject or if I can help you with this

Thank you all for reading, feel free to comment

Erran Bar Shushan

Scientists Prove There is Life After Death


“Cosmology and Consciousness Conference – Mind and Matter” (2011)

Life After Life │ Death Experiences │ Full Documentary │

“Is Consciousness Produced by the Brain?” by Bruce Greyson

Life Afterlife (FULL DOCUMENTARY)

Life Afterlife takes an intriguing look at the eternal question: Is there life after death? And if so, can we communicate with the dead? Through personal stories from everyday people who claim they’ve made contact with deceased friends and relatives, to self-proclaimed mediums, to philosophers and scientists who’ve dedicated their lives to these issues, this film examines the fact and fantasy of the last great frontier. The documentary was produced and directed by Lisa F. Jackson. Executive producers are Linda Ellerbee and Rolfe Tessem. First aired on HBO in October of 1999.

Strange experiences reported at the time of death, including near-death experiences and death-bed visions, are often dismissed by skeptics as artifacts of the dying patient’s misfiring brain. But such explanations are confounded by the fact that, in some cases, other quite healthy people present in the room with the dying also experience the ‘veil’ to the afterlife being lifted.

For example, there have been numerous cases in which carers for the dying have described seeing a bright light surrounding the dying person, exuding what they relate as “a raw feeling of love”. What sort of numbers are we talking? Researcher Peter Fenwick was amazed to find in a survey that one in every three palliative carers reported accounts of “a radiant light that envelops the dying person, and may spread throughout the room and involve the carer”. In a similar Dutch study, more than half of the carers surveyed reported witnessing this ‘light’! Meanwhile in a questionnaire put to palliative care nurses in Australia, one respondent told how he, another nurse, and the patient’s husband saw a blue-white light leave the body of the patient and drift toward the ceiling. “As she died we just noticed like an energy rising from her…sort of a bluey white sort of aura,” the nurse explained. “We looked at each other, and the husband was on the other side of the bed and he was looking at us… he saw it as well and he said he thinks that she went to a better place”. As is often the case, this experience was transformative for the nurse: “It probably changed the way I felt about people dying and what actually happens after death”. In fact the researcher responsible for the Australian survey, Deborah Morris, was herself originally inspired to investigate death-bed experiences further by her own experience of seeing ‘the dying light’. “There was a young man who had died in the room with his family and I saw an aura coming off him,” she recounts. “It was like a mist. I didn’t tell anybody for years. I’ve never seen it again”.

Peter Fenwick relates an instance in which a person, at the time of their brother’s death, witnessed “odd tiny sparks of bright light” emanating from the body – and what’s more, these ‘sparks’ were also seen by another person in the room. In another case, a carer awoke in the darkness of early morning to the sight of “a flame licking the top of the wall against the ceiling” above her dying father’s bed. “I saw a plume of smoke rising, like the vapour that rises from a snuffed-out candle, but on a bigger scale…it was being thrown off by a single blade of phosphorus light”, the witness recounted. “It hung above Dad’s bed, about 18 inches or so long, and was indescribably beautiful…it seemed to express perfect love and peace”. She switched on the light to investigate further, but the light instantly vanished; “the room was the same as always on a November morning, cold and cheerless, with no sound of breathing from Dad’s bed. His body was still warm”. This sighting of a vapour-like substance leaving the body at the time of death is another element that is often reported:

As he died something which is very hard to describe because it was so unexpected and because I had seen nothing like it left up through his body and out of his head. It resembled distinct delicate waves/lines of smoke (smoke is not the right word but I have not got a comparison) and then disappeared. I was the only one to see it. It left me with such a sense of peace and comfort. I don’t think that we were particularly close as my sister and I had been sent off to boarding school at an early age.

I do not believe in God. But as to an afterlife I now really do not know what to think.

Family, carers and physicians have also reported various other phenomena occurring at the time of death, from the sounds of angelic choirs singing through to visions of the already deceased at the dying person’s bedside. For example, one woman reported that as she watched her mother pass away…

…Suddenly I was aware that her father was stood at the foot of her bed. My mother was staring at him too and her face was lit up with joy. It was then that I saw her face appeared to be glowing with a gold light. The light began to leave through the top of her head and go towards the ceiling. Looking back to my mother’s face I saw that she was no longer breathing.

Similarly, Peter Fenwick was told by one lady that while sitting at her dying husband’s bedside there was suddenly “a most brilliant light shining from my husband’s chest”. The light began to rise toward the ceiling, and she began hearing “the most beautiful music and singing voices”, filling her with an overwhelming feeling of joy. At this point, the nurse interrupted with news that her husband had just passed, and the light and the music instantly disappeared, leaving the woman bereft at being left behind, after being shown just the barest of glimpses ‘behind the veil’.

Certainly, those witnessing the death of another person are sure to be under psychological stress, so perhaps in some cases we could explain cases away as some sort of hallucination. However, in cases where multiple witnesses in the same room describe the same vision, we really do being to feel as if we’re reaching for mundane explanations.

Crossovers between Mediumship and Near-Death Experiences

After days of struggle against the disease that had struck him down, Dr. Horace Ackley could take no more. All of a sudden, he felt himself gradually rising from his body; as his organs ceased functioning, Dr. Ackley suddenly found himself in a position slightly above his lifeless physical body, looking down on it and those who had been in the room with him. Then, without warning…

…the scenes of my whole life seemed to move before me like a panorama; every act seemed as though it were drawn in life size and was really present: it was all there, down to the closing scenes. So rapidly did it pass, that I had little time for reflection. I seemed to be in a whirlpool of excitement; and then, just as suddenly as this panorama had been presented, it was withdrawn, and I was left without a thought of the past or future to contemplate my present condition.

Dr. Ackley realized that he must have died, and was gratified to learn that it seemed a rather pleasant experience. “Death is not so bad a thing after all,” he said to himself, “and I should like to see what that country is that I am going to, if I am a spirit.” His only regret, looking down on the whirl of activity in the room, was that he was unable to inform his friends that he lived on, to set their minds and hearts at ease. At this point, two ‘guardian spirits’ appeared before Dr. Ackley, greeting him by name before leading him from the room into an area where a number of ‘spirits’ whom he was familiar with had assembled.

Those familiar with accounts of near-death experiences might well be saying to themselves “ho-hum, another stock-standard near-death experience”. They might guess that Dr. Ackley then woke up in his resuscitated body and told an NDE researcher about his experience. But if they did, they would be wrong. Dr. Horace Ackley truly did die that day, never to return to this life. The report that you read above was an account of his death, allegedly given by him through a spirit medium – one Samuel Paist of Philadelphia. And what makes it truly remarkable is that it was written down by Paist in his book A Narrative of the Experience of Horace Abraham Ackley, M.D., and published in 1861 – more than a century before the near-death experience had come to the attention of researchers and the general public. And yet Paist/Ackley tells of an OBE shortly after death, a “panoramic” life review (the exact word “panoramic” is found in many NDE reports), and being greeted by spirits who subsequently guided him to an afterlife realm!

But the after-death narrative of Dr. Horace Ackley is not an isolated instance. More than a decade before the publication of Raymond Moody’s Life After Life – the book that started the modern fascination with near-death experiences – another scientist had already investigated and written at length on the topic. In a pair of relatively obscure books – The Supreme Adventure (1961) and Intimations of Immortality (1965) – Dr. Robert Crookall cited numerous examples of what he called “pseudo-death,” noting the archetypal elements that Moody would later bring to the public’s attention as the near-death experience. What’s more however, Crookall also compared these tales of ‘pseudo-death’ with accounts of the dying process as told by ‘communicators’ through mediums – and found a number of these same recurring elements, well before they became public knowledge through Moody’s Life After Life.

For example, Crookall showed that, according to ostensibly dead ‘communicators’ talking through mediums, the newly- deceased are usually met by other deceased loved ones: “Usually friends or relatives take the newly-dead man in charge”. This of course may not be considered a surprising thing for a medium to say – it’s probably what most people would expectantly hope for upon entering the spirit realm. But the common elements continue, and include some of the more idiosyncratic features of the NDE. For instance, Crookall noted that, as with the case of Dr. Ackley above, communicators often declare through mediums that “in the early stages of transition, they experienced a panoramic review of their past lives”. In one case the communicator recounted that shortly after death “the scenes of the past life” are revealed; another said that upon ‘waking’ his “entire life unreeled itself”. A dead communicator by the name of Scott told medium Jane Sherwood that his thoughts “raced over the record of a whole long lifetime”, while another communicator said that he saw “clearer and clearer the events of my past life pass, in a long procession, before me.”

Beyond the meeting with the familiar dead, and the past life review, Crookall’s research also found that mediumistic communicators regularly make note of the out-of-body experience component. For example, one communicator noted that he “seemed to rise up out of my body”. According to another, “I was not lying in the bed, but floating in the air, a little above it. I saw the body, stretched out straight”. Furthermore, they also describe the familiar element of traveling through a tunnel! “I saw in front of me a dark tunnel,” said one communicator, before travelling through it and then stepping “out of the tunnel into a new world”. Another communicator noted that they remembered “a curious opening, as if one had passed through subterranean passages and found oneself near the mouth of a cave… The light was much stronger outside”. And once through the ‘tunnel’, the environment is once again familiar to anyone who has perused a catalogue of NDEs: “I was with ‘B’ [her son, killed in the War]: he took me to a world so brilliant that I can’t describe it”.

The common elements are compelling. For anyone familiar with the NDE literature, these reports through mediums are startlingly similar to the accounts of near-death experiencers – and yet Crookall collected them years before the archetype of the NDE became common knowledge. And what’s more, not only do they seem to offer support for the validity of the near-death experience, they also hint that there may well be more to the much-maligned subject of mediumship.

Consciousness never die – proofs from near-death experience Dr. Eben Alexander


near-death experience

near-death experience

The “near-death experience” reported by cardiac arrest survivors worldwide may be grounded in science, according to research at the University of Michigan Health System.

Whether and how the dying brain is capable of generating conscious activity has been vigorously debated.

But in this week’s PNAS Early Edition, a U-M study shows shortly after clinical death, in which the heart stops beating and blood stops flowing to the brain, rats display brain activity patterns characteristic of conscious perception.

“This study, performed in animals, is the first dealing with what happens to the neurophysiological state of the dying brain,” says lead study author Jimo Borjigin, Ph.D., associate professor of molecular and integrative physiology and associate professor of neurology at the University of Michigan Medical School.

“It will form the foundation for future human studies investigating mental experiences occurring in the dying brain, including seeing light during cardiac arrest,” she says.

Approximately 20 percent of cardiac arrest survivors report having had a near-death experience during clinical death. These visions and perceptions have been called “realer than real,” according to previous research, but it remains unclear whether the brain is capable of such activity after cardiac arrest.

“We reasoned that if near-death experience stems from brain activity, neural correlates of consciousness should be identifiable in humans or animals even after the cessation of cerebral blood flow,” she says.

Researchers analyzed the recordings of brain activity called electroencephalograms (EEGs) from nine anesthetized rats undergoing experimentally induced cardiac arrest.

Within the first 30 seconds after cardiac arrest, all of the rats displayed a widespread, transient surge of highly synchronized brain activity that had features associated with a highly aroused brain.

Furthermore, the authors observed nearly identical patterns in the dying brains of rats undergoing asphyxiation.

“The prediction that we would find some signs of conscious activity in the brain during cardiac arrest was confirmed with the data,” says Borjigin, who conceived the idea for the project in 2007 with study co-author neurologist Michael M. Wang, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of neurology and associate professor of molecular and integrative physiology at the U-M.

“But, we were surprised by the high levels of activity,” adds study senior author anesthesiologist George Mashour, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of anesthesiology and neurosurgery at the U-M. ” In fact, at near-death, many known electrical signatures of consciousness exceeded levels found in the waking state, suggesting that the brain is capable of well-organized electrical activity during the early stage of clinical death.­­­”

The brain is assumed to be inactive during cardiac arrest. However the neurophysiological state of the brain immediately following cardiac arrest had not been systemically investigated until now.

The current study resulted from collaboration between the labs of Borjigin and Mashour, with U-M physicist UnCheol Lee, Ph.D., playing a critical role in analysis.

“This study tells us that reduction of oxygen or both oxygen and glucose during cardiac arrest can stimulate brain activity that is characteristic of conscious processing,” says Borjigin. “It also provides the first scientific framework for the near-death experiences reported by many cardiac arrest survivors.”

Interview reveals how a near-death experience changed everything neurosurgeon Dr. Eben Alexander thought he knew about consciousness, spirituality, and life after death.

Join Skeptiko host Alex Tsakiris for an interview with neurosurgeon Dr. Eben Alexander.  During the interview Dr. Alexander discusses letting go of our simplistic view of consciousness:

Alex Tsakiris: Can we really then hope to get out of the consciousness loop that we’re in now? Or is there something fundamental to the way that we’re constructed that’s going to keep us limited in how much we can really?

Dr. Eben Alexander: What I think is going to happen is that science and spirituality, which will be mainly be an acknowledgement of the profound nature of our consciousness, will grow closer and closer together.

One thing that we will have to let go of is this kind of addiction to simplistic, primitive reductive materialism because there’s really no way that I can see a reductive materialist model coming remotely in the right ballpark to explain what we really know about consciousness now.

Coming from a neurosurgeon who, before my coma, thought I was quite certain how the brain and the mind interacted and it was clear to me that there were many things I could do or see done on my patients and it would eliminate consciousness. It was very clear in that realm that the brain gives you consciousness and everything else and when the brain dies there goes consciousness, soul, mind—it’s all gone. And it was clear.

Now, having been through my coma, I can tell you that’s exactly wrong and that in fact the mind and consciousness are independent of the brain. It’s very hard to explain that, certainly if you’re limiting yourself to that reductive materialist view.

Dr. Eben AlexanderDr. Eben 

Dr. Eben Alexander’s Website http://www.lifebeyonddeath.net/

Read It:

Today we welcome Dr. Eben Alexander to Skeptiko. Dr. Alexander has been an academic neurosurgeon for more than 25 years, including 15 years at Harvard Medical School in Boston. In November of 2008, he had a near-death experience that changed his life and caused him to rethink everything he thought he knew about the human brain and consciousness.

Dr. Alexander, welcome to Skeptiko.

Dr. Eben Alexander: Thank you. It’s good to be here.

Alex Tsakiris: Well, your story is really quite amazing. For those who haven’t heard of it and aren’t aware of what you went through, do you want to tell us a little bit about your experience?

Dr. Eben Alexander: Yes. It really struck out of the blue. I’d been quite healthy up until that time. In fact, I was in reasonably good shape because my older son had been putting me through a big workout, anticipating a climb of a 20,000 foot volcano in South America.

Alex Tsakiris: Wow.

Dr. Eben Alexander: Luckily I was in pretty good shape. At 4:30 in the morning, November 10, 2008, I got out of bed. I was getting ready to go up to work. I was working in Charlottesville at the time and I had severe sudden back pain, much worse than I had ever experienced. Literally within 10 or 15 minutes, it got me to a point where I could not even take a step. I was really in tremendous agony.

My wife, Holly, was rubbing my back. Then my younger son, Bond, came in and saw I was in a lot of distress and he started rubbing my temples. I realized when he did that that I had a severe headache. It was like he took a railroad spike and put it through my head. But I was already really going down very quickly. I didn’t know it at the time.

I found out much later that I had acute bacterial meningitis and it was a very unusual bacteria. One that the incidence of spontaneous E. coli meningitis in adults in the U.S. is about 1 in 10 million per year. So it’s really rare. We never found out where it came from. But at any rate, it was in about 2 to 2-1/2 hours it drove me deep down and in fact, my last words really were to my wife, “Don’t call 911. Trust me, I’m a doctor.”

Luckily she overruled that and she did that because she saw me having a grand mal seizure on the bed. Of course I don’t remember that and I really don’t remember anything that happened for the next week because I was gone. I was very sick during that time as I heard later. In fact, I was so sick that I was on a ventilator the whole week.

They did several lumbar punctures trying to guide therapy. I was on triple antibiotics very early on, due to a very good medical team. They did a lumbar puncture about the second or third day into this and my cerebral spinal fluid glucose, which is normally around 60 to 80 and in a bad case of meningitis might drop down to about 20, well my glucose went down to 1. So I was really sick.

Alex Tsakiris: So at this point, nothing should be going on in your brain and yet something was happening in your conscious awareness.

Dr. Eben Alexander: Yeah, I’d say that’s correct. To me, and I’ve spent a lot of time in the last three years trying to explain this and that explanation initially, all I was doing was trying to explain it neuroscientifically. Meningitis is very helpful because it’s probably better than anything else at really diffusely wiping out the neocortex. But one can always argue that there’s some idling function at a deep level that might still survive.

In fact, one of the hypotheses that I entertained about all this was because the experience that I’ll describe to you seemed very hyper-real and extremely crisp and vivid, much more real and interactive than sitting here and talking with you right now. I mean, it was extraordinary. That is something that is often described in near-death experiences and of course one of my early hypotheses was well, maybe there’s some differential effect against inhibitory neuronal networks that allowed over-expression of excitatory neural networks and gave this illusion of kind of a hyper-real situation.

I can tell you from having lived through it that it was so powerful and so beyond that kind of explanation that I wasn’t very hopeful that that would work out in the end. But I figured I needed to give it a chance and look at the microanatomy in the cortex and the different connections with the thalamus and basal ganglia and see if I could come up with some way that one might have an illusion of hyper-reality.

I can tell you because of the kind of content of the experience and the powerful, overwhelming nature of it and the fact that it was so complex, I think much of what I remembered from that experience, I don’t think my brain and mind could possibly manage that even now.

I mean, the kind of mental function that occurs when you’re in that hyper-real state, the way that information comes in from spiritual beings and kind of the interaction with them is so intense and extraordinary, it’s really inexplicable in earthly terms. But it would basically outrun any of those kind of theories. That was something I was looking for. In fact, I never found an anatomic distribution that would support that over-activity of excitatory pathways.

Alex Tsakiris: Great. Thanks for doing that. I think we’ve jumped a little bit ahead of the story. For those who don’t know, tell us a little bit about your NDE.

Dr. Eben Alexander: Okay. Well, you were asking what it is like when one has their cortex shut down like that, and in fact, for one thing I was surprised that I remembered anything because as a neurosurgeon having had many patients who were in comas for various reasons and had a lot of them recover, my understanding was that in general you don’t really remember anything.

Even when the patients seem to be interacting I knew that usually if they’d been sick, for instance with meningitis, that they really wouldn’t remember much of it. Occasionally there were exceptions to that. You’d have patients who would remember very remarkable things from deep inside, but before I had always kind of explained that away with the standard answers. “Oh, that’s what the brain does when it’s very sick.”

What I do remember from deep inside coma, for one thing my first awareness was I had no memory whatsoever of my life. I had no language, no words. All of my experience in life, knowledge of humans, Earth, the universe, all of that was gone. The only thing I had was this very kind of crude existence. And I call it in my book the “earthworm’s eye-view,” because it really was just a crude, kind of underground.

I have a vivid memory of dark roots above me and there was a kind of monotonous pounding, a dull sound in the background pounding away eternally. It was just murky and gross. Every now and then a face, an animal or something would boil up out of the muck and there might be some chant or roar or something. Then they’d disappear again.

It sounds very foreboding to talk about it right now, but in fact, since I knew no other existence I don’t remember being particularly alarmed when I was in that setting. I think that that was the best consciousness that my brain could muster when it was soaking in pus. It turns out that that seemed to last for a very long time. Given that it was my first awareness of anything, it actually seemed to be years or eternity. I don’t know. It seemed like a very, very long time.

Then there was a spinning melody, this bright melody that just started spinning in front of me. Beautiful, beautiful melody compared to that dull pounding sound that I’d heard for eons. It spun and as it spun around, it cleared everything away. This was the part that was so shocking and so hard to explain. It was as if the blinders came off and the reality there was much more crisp, real, and interactive and fresh than any reality I’ve ever known in this earthly existence. That part is very shocking and hard to explain when you go through it, and yet what I’ve found since then is that a lot of people who have had NDEs discuss the same kind of hyper-reality. But it’s very shocking to see it.

For me, I was a speck on a butterfly wing. I had no body awareness at all. In fact, I had no body awareness through this entire kind of deep coma experience. I was a speck on a beautiful butterfly wing; millions of other butterflies around us. We were flying through blooming flowers, blossoms on trees, and they were all coming out as we flew through them.

Beside me on the butterfly wing was a beautiful girl. I remember her face to this day. Absolutely beautiful girl, blue eyes, and she was dressed in–what I was trying to write all this up in the months after I came back—I described as a kind of peasant garb. I can remember the colors very well. Kind of a peach/orange and a powder blue, just really beautiful.

She never said a word to me and she was looking at me and her thoughts would just come into my awareness. Her thoughts were things like, “You are loved. You are cherished forever. There’s nothing you can do wrong. You have nothing to worry about. You will be taken care of.” It was so soothing and so beautiful, and of course as I said, my language wasn’t really working then. So those particular words were words I had to put on it when I came back out. But a lot of this flowed perfectly when I came back out.

In fact, I didn’t read anything about near-death experiences or about physics or cosmology because of the advice my older son, Eben IV, who was majoring in neuroscience at the University of Delaware advised me. Three days after I left the hospital, when he came home for Thanksgiving back in 2008, he said, “Well, if you want to write this up as a useful report, don’t read anything. Just write everything down you can remember.”

I spent the next two months typing everything I could remember in the computer. It came out to about 100 pages of memories from this deep experience within the coma. I think from that beautiful valley scene on the butterfly wing, waterfalls, pools of water, indescribable colors, and above there were these arks of silver and gold light and beautiful hymns coming down from them. Indescribably gorgeous hymns. I later came to call them “angels,” those arks of light in the sky. I think that word is probably fairly accurate.

On this butterfly wing, the first time I was there, I remember having this sensation. It was as if there was a warm summer breeze that just blew by. Then everything changed and the scene stayed the same but I became aware. Again in looking back on it, that was my awareness of a Divine presence of incredibly indescribable, kind of a superpower of divinity. Then we went out of this universe.

I remember just seeing everything receding and initially I felt as if my awareness was in an infinite black void. It was very comforting but I could feel the extent of the infinity and that it was, as you would expect, impossible to put into words. I was there with that Divine presence that was not anything that I could visibly see and describe, and with a brilliant orb of light. There was a distinct sensation from me, a memory, that they were not one and the same. I don’t know what that means.

In my awareness, when I say I was aware, this goes far, far beyond the consciousness of any one—this is not Eben Alexander’s consciousness aware of being in that space. I was far beyond that point, way beyond any kind of human consciousness, and really just one consciousness. When I got there they said that I would be going back, but I didn’t know what that meant.

They said there were many things that they would show me, and they continued to do that. In fact, the whole higher-dimensional multiverse was that this incredibly complex corrugated ball and all these lessons coming into me about it. Part of the lessons involved becoming all of what I was being shown. It was indescribable.

But then I would find myself—and time out there I can say is totally different from what we call time. There was access from out there to any part of our space/time and that made it difficult to understand a lot of these memories because we always try to sequence things and put them in linear form and description. That just really doesn’t work.

But suffice it to say that I would find myself back at the earthworm eye-view. What I learned was that if I could recall the notes of that melody, the spinning melody, that would start the melody spinning again and that would take me back into that beautiful, crisp, clear hyper-real valley on the butterfly wing. My guardian angel was always there and she was always very comforting.

Then we would go out into what I came to call “the coral,” which was outside of the entire physical universe. Again, they would show lessons and often those lessons would involve becoming a tremendous part of what they were demonstrating.

So much of it is just indescribable and so much of it there are reasons why we cannot bring a lot of that back. And there are reasons, in fact, it’s why I’ve come to see that we’re conscious in spite of our brain. To me that makes a lot more sense.

I go into detail about all that in my book, but it turns out that I would oscillate from this beautiful, idyllic place in the core, coming back down into earthworm eye-view, and it seems it was three or four times. Like I said, sequencing was so strange because when I was in the earthworm eye-view, everything seemed to be one kind of soup of just mixed foam. It was very hard to put sequence on it but it was very clear to me that several times I would use the memory of those notes and spin that melody and go back in. They would always say, “You are not here to stay.”

Alex Tsakiris: Dr. Alexander, a couple of questions. First, what is the title of your book?

Dr. Eben Alexander: Okay. Well, I’m going through several possible agents right now. I don’t have a publisher and I have a feeling that agents and publishers will have their own ideas. What I can tell you is that the tentative working title right now, and this could easily change, is Life Beyond Death: A Neurosurgeon’s Life-Changing Near-Death Odyssey.

Alex Tsakiris: Let me hone in on a couple of things. It’s an amazing experience, an amazing account. Tell us a little bit about coming back into this world. I want to hone in on a couple of things that we need to nail down if we’re going to really try and understand this account from our world.

One thing I want to nail down is the time perspective. How do we know that these memories were formed during the time when you’re in a coma? You’ve already laid out a couple of points about that in that normally we wouldn’t even expect you to have a lot of clear, coherent memories three days after coming out of this coma. But you said that’s when you started writing down this account. You also said you tried not to contaminate your memories with talking to other people. So those are good parts of your story.

What are some other aspects of it that you can tell us that make you confident that these memories were formed while you were in this severely compromised mental state?

Dr. Eben Alexander: I can tell you that when I first started waking up, it was very shocking because as I said, I didn’t have memories of my life before and my family, loved ones, sisters, my wife and sons, they were there. So initially I have a very distinct memory as I was emerging, which was on the seventh day of coma. I was still on the ventilator and still had the endotracheal tube in.

My awareness was of several faces. I remember one was my wife and one was a good friend of ours who is also my infectious disease doctor and a neighbor, Dr. Scott Wade. Then one was also my 10-year-old son. These faces were there. I did not recognize them. They would say words. I didn’t understand the words, but I had a very powerful visual memory. They would kind of boil up out of the muck and then they’d go away.

I’m fairly sure that was Sunday morning because much, much later, after I’d written everything down and I did start asking people about things that had happened, it seemed that that’s when people were doing that. Now in fact, they’d been doing it all week but I think I was unaware of it during the week. That’s mainly based on the people that I do remember seeing who only those who were there that Sunday morning were.

My language started coming back very quickly and so did my visual cortex, because I think—again, it’s so hard to put a time label on this. But in talking with people who were there, I think that probably over an hour or two or three I started getting language back quickly. My auditory cortex started coming online. My ability to understand speech, so what’s called Wernicke’s area in the dominant temporal lobe was starting to come back up to speed and I can understand things. I could then start making speech.

So I was having a very rapid return of cortical function, but I was still kind of in and out of reality. In fact, in my book I go into great detail describing what I call the “nightmare,” which was kind of a paranoid, crazy thing where I was halfway in and out of reality. My younger son, Bond, he can describe it to you. It was kind of a very frightening thing because I would seem to be with it and then I’d be saying things that were just out of my mind.

Of course, initially as I explained to some of my physicians, what I remembered was this incredibly powerful hyper-real spiritual experience. They would say, “Oh, yes, well you were very, very sick. We thought you were going to die. I can’t even believe that you’re back.” They were predicting that I would have two to three months in the hospital and then need chronic care for the rest of my life. So they were obviously quite shocked that I came back like I did. It was just so strange.

Initially I thought, “Gosh, it was almost too real to be real.” That hyper-reality that people describe, I just wish we could bottle that up and give it to people so they could see what it’s like because it is not something that is going to be explained by these little simplistic kind of talking about CO2 and oxygen levels. That just won’t work. I promise you that won’t work.

Alex Tsakiris: That’s an interesting point because as you mentioned briefly, you know it won’t work because you actually went and tried to see if there was a model that you were aware of from your training that could fit your experience, right?

So you became a near-death experiencer who became a near-death experience researcher from a neurophysiological standpoint. I think that’s one of the things that really draws people to your story. Tell us a little bit more about your quest to understand this from the perspective of your background as a neurosurgeon.

Dr. Eben Alexander: Okay, well I can tell you that I mentioned a few minutes ago that initially I was getting the message from my physicians that I was extremely sick and it doesn’t surprise them that I had very, very unusual memories. There was one other thing that really got my attention that I’ll mention, and that is I told you about the faces I saw kind of floating in the muck, which I think—again, it’s hard to put a time on it. I know that some of them appeared that Sunday morning and maybe the Saturday afternoon. Some could have been earlier.

There was one that I think was earlier, although she seems like all the rest. Her name is Susan Reintjes and she’s a friend of my wife’s. They worked together 25 years earlier teaching in Raleigh. Susan’s had a lot of experience helping coma patients. She wrote a book called, Third Eye Open. It’s about her going into a state or trance and then going to them in whatever fashion. That’s not something I claim to understand. But not through the physical material realm.

In fact, she had done that with a lot of patients and she discussed that in her book. Holly called her up, I think it was Thursday at night that Susan heard all this and said, “Yes, I’ll try and help.” I remember her being there very clearly. I mean, just like all the rest. She was there and she never was physically there. She did this from Chapel Hill where she lives.

Of course, in the first few days as I was coming around and I told my wife about the six faces that I remembered, that does not include my guardian angel who I still didn’t know at that time, but those six faces. And Susan Reintjes was there. Holly said, “She did come to you channeling. She came to you in the psychic realm.” I can tell you when Holly told me that I said, “Of course. Don’t need any explanation for that.”

Of course, as I healed—it probably took three or four weeks for a lot of my neuroscience and neurosurgical training to come back—all along that time I was still writing all this down and not reading anything. I was very tempted but my son had told me, “You want this to be worthwhile, don’t read anything else. Just write it all down.” I just was shocked; I was buffeted because my neuroscience mind said, “No, that couldn’t happen.” The more I heard about how sick I was, my cortex shut down, “No, that’s impossible, your cortex was down.”

Of course, for a while I was going after the hypotheses that involved formation of these very complex, intricate memories either right before my coma or right coming out of it. That really did not explain it at all. Part of the problem, when you get right down to it, is that whole issue of remembering the melody because that was a very clear part of it. I remember the elation when I figured that I could just remember that melody and that spun the melody in front of me.

Then all of a sudden, boom! Everything opened up and I went back out into that valley, so crisp and beautiful, and my angel was with me, as I came to call her, my companion on the butterfly wing. And then out into the core, outside of the universe. Very difficult to explain in that fluctuation.

I guess one could always argue, “Well, your brain was probably just barely able to ignite real consciousness and then it would flip back into a very diseased state,” which doesn’t make any sense to me. Especially because that hyper-real state is so indescribable and so crisp. It’s totally unlike any drug experience. A lot of people have come up to me and said, “Oh that sounds like a DMT experience, ”or“ That sounds like ketamine.” Not at all. That is not even in the right ballpark.

Those things do not explain the kind of clarity, the rich interactivity, the layer upon layer of understanding and of lessons taught by deceased loved ones and spiritual beings. Of course, they’re all deceased loved ones. I’ve kind of wondered where it is that these people are coming from. They say, “The brain was very sick but it was very selective and made sure it only remembered deceased loved ones.” They’re just not hearing something.

Alex Tsakiris: You know, I think that brings up a very interesting point and one that we’ve covered a lot on this show. To be fair—well, not only to be fair but to really understand the entire phenomena and understand how it fits in our culture, in our society, which I think is important because here you are, someone like yourself with your obvious intellectual capabilities but also medical understanding and you have this experience and you have to come back and try and make it make sense with all your training.

I think all the rest of us are right there with you trying to make sense of these completely counter-intuitive experiences and then trying to jam them back in our head and in our experience. In that sense, I do have a lot of empathy and appreciation for the NDE researchers, both the skeptical ones and the non-skeptical ones. So let me talk a little bit about that NDE research and get your perspective on it. Of course there are a few of these brave researchers out there who have stuck their neck out—really only a very few—and have tried to tackle this.

It seems to me that they’re really barely making a dent in the medical model that we have. The medical model that we have sees us as these biological robots and death as kind of the ultimate Boogeyman. Can we really believe that we’re really going to change such an entrenched system?

Dr. Eben Alexander: I think so. I think that is very much a possibility. There’s this whole issue of mind and brain and duality versus non-dualism and the physical material reductivist models. I go into this in great detail in my book but I think you have to go back about 3,000 years to really get to the beginning of the discussion and to start to see why certain things have transpired.

I think most importantly was the part of this discussion that happened between Rene Descartes and Spinoza back in the 17th Century. They started us into our current era. Our current era is one of mind/consciousness/our soul has been put in the realm of the church more-or-less. There was kind of a truce of sorts that I guess Descartes came up with back then to say there’s mind and then there’s body and just let the natural scientists, those with an interest like Francis Bacon and Galileo and Newton, let’s not burn them all at the stake. Let some of them survive.

So I think it was a good thing to have that truce so that science survived. I mean, I’m a scientist and I love science and the scientific method. I’ve just come to realize that the universe is much grander than we appreciate. So I have to simply broaden my definitions.

I think science is still very important to get us there. Getting back to that mind/brain issue, what happened over time is science kind of grew up and got to be more and more powerful at giving us many things. Science has been a real wonder. But I think that it’s been somewhat at a price and that price came from splitting out mind and body back then and that dualistic approach because as science gained more and more of an upper hand, people were losing track of the kind of mind part of it, the consciousness part.

Alex Tsakiris: Let’s talk about that a little bit right now because part of that does seem to be contradictory to your experience and the experiences we’ve heard from other folks who have had these transformative spiritual experiences in that if there is this broader knowing—and much broader—broader doesn’t even begin to describe it but that we hear over and over again.

We hear it from your account; we hear it from many near-death experience accounts. We also hear it from all sorts of transformative spiritual accounts, kundulini accounts, spontaneous spiritual awakenings. There’s this sense of knowing, much, much greater knowing that then must be crammed back into our body and it doesn’t fit, you know? So your account says that and others do, as well.

Can we really then hope to get out of the consciousness loop that we’re in now? Is it just going to be a matter of a philosophical shift like we had back in the 1700’s? Or is there something fundamental to the way that we’re constructed that’s going to keep us limited in how much we can really tap into and understand that knowing that you experienced?

Dr. Eben Alexander: In my view, what I think is going to happen is that science in the much broader sense of the word and spirituality which will be mainly an acknowledgement of the profound nature of our consciousness will grow closer and closer together. We will all move forward into a far more enlightened world. One thing that we will have to let go of is this kind of addiction to simplistic, primitive reductive materialism because there’s really no way that I can see a reductive materialist model coming remotely in the right ballpark to explain what we really know about consciousness now.

Coming from a neurosurgeon who, before my coma, thought I was quite certain how the brain and the mind interacted and it was clear to me that there were many things I could do or see done on my patients and it would eliminate consciousness. It was very clear in that realm that the brain gives you consciousness and everything else and when the brain dies there goes consciousness, soul, mind—it’s all gone. And it was clear.

Now, having been through my coma, I can tell you that’s exactly wrong and that in fact the mind and consciousness are independent of the brain. It’s very hard to explain that, certainly if you’re limiting yourself to that reductive materialist view.

Any of the scientists in the crowd who want to get in on this, what I would recommend is there’s one book I consider the bible of this. It’s a wonderful book but it is really for those who have a strong scientific interest in it. It’s called Irreducible Mind, Edward Kelly, Emily Williams Kelly, Bruce Greyson, Adam Crabtree, Alan Galt, Michael Grassa, the whole group from Esalen and also based in the Division of Perceptual Studies at the University of Virginia, have done an incredibly good job. Toward a Psychology for the 21st Century is the subtitle and that’s exactly what it is.

I felt their book was quite illustrative and of course it caused a huge splash when it came out in 1987, but again a lot of the reductive materialists like myself were not really going to put in the work to go through all of that. We just thought, “We can’t understand it so it can’t be true.”

Alex Tsakiris: I think you’re being a little bit too generous there because some of the folks do do the work. Do tap into the research and still come out the other end holding onto that materialistic model that we’re stuck with here because there’s a lot invested in it. With that, what I wanted to do was I sent you a couple of audio clips that I thought you might like to respond to because it fits in with what you were just talking about–people who have walked in your shoes and are still there in that model.

The first clip I’d like to play for you is a former guest on this show, Dr. Steven Novella, who is a clinical neurologist at Yale University. He’s a well-known and outspoken skeptic of near-death experiences but a nice guy who’s willing to engage the topic. What I thought I’d do is play this little clip and see any response you might have to it, okay?

Dr. Eben Alexander: All right.

Dr. Steven Novella: The three basic kinds of explanations are one is spiritual; that it represents the fact that the mind can exist separate from the brain. The second one is a psychological experience of some sort. And then the third is that it’s organic; it’s neurophysiological. The evidence and some of the best explanatory models that people are putting forward are blending the second two, the psychological and the organic, the neuroscientific. I think what we’re seeing is that there’s a core experience that’s primarily organic. It’s just the kinds of things that can happen to the brain under various kinds of stress.

Alex Tsakiris: Now, I’ve got to add that if you really listen to the whole interview with Steve and the follow-up that we had, what he’s talking about is really a bunch of fluff. [Laughs] There really isn’t any research that shows any neurophysiological cause for near-death experience. I really held his feet to the fire and he was unable to produce anything of any real substance about that research.

But maybe you can talk because it speaks so much to the position that you were in just a few years ago, about that position and that kind of entrenched “It has to be in the brain” kind of thing and how you think that relates to near-death experience.

Dr. Eben Alexander: I would say for one thing I think that a healthy skeptical approach to all this is a good thing because it helps us get to the truth. It helps us know the answer. What we have to be careful of, of course, is not getting in the trap of having our prejudices rule the day. A lot of these experiments and studies, how you interpret them will depend a lot on what your prejudices are going in.

I found early on in my experience, I had to do as Descartes recommended when he was talking about getting to the truth, and that was to really ignore or to reject everything I had ever accepted as real. That was the only way to start getting to where I could figure any of this out. I

know that a lot of the reductive scientific crowd out there—I have a favorite quote from Stephen Hawking. He says, “There’s a fundamental difference between religion, which is based on authority or imposed dogma and faith, as opposed to science which is based on observation and reason.” What I would say is I think his statement is true as a general statement but that science, and certainly those who believe in science and scientists, are as prone to addiction to imposed dogma and faith as our religious zealot. So one has to be very careful to really step back and want to know the truth. That’s what I think we all would like to know.

Alex Tsakiris: In this case, if we really do step back one of the things that’s troubling to me, and you touched on it a minute ago, is how overwhelming the evidence seems to be. At this point, we can confidently say that near-death experiences didn’t just start happening in the last 20 years since we had advanced resuscitation techniques.

We can confidently say that 4% to 5% of everyone who has a cardiac arrest is having this. There’s obviously hundreds of millions of people over time who have had these accounts and we have thousands and thousands of well-documented, consistent accounts across cultures, across times. These are the measures that we would normally use to say, “This is a real phenomenon.”

And then when the skeptics, and really the mainstream scientists have pounded against it for 20 years with really what amounts to a bunch of very silly explanations but ones that have been carefully looked at and dismissed—was it CO2 , a fear of death, other psychological factors? Is it all the different things like REM intrusion? All these things.

Clearly this would normally be something where we’d be putting a lot of attention into it. Or that it would then become the presumed explanation for it. But none of that’s happening. They have managed to hold back the dyke, you know? So what do you make of that?

Dr. Eben Alexander: Okay, I think in trying to get back to your original question with the previous guest, to me one thing that has emerged from my experience and from very rigorous analysis of that experience over several years, talking it over with others that I respect in neuroscience, and really trying to come up with an answer, is that consciousness outside of the brain is a fact. It’s an established fact.

And of course, that was a hard place for me to get, coming from being a card-toting reductive materialist over decades. It was very difficult to get to knowing that consciousness, that there’s a soul of us that is not dependent on the brain. As much as I know all the reductive materialist arguments against that, I think part of the problem is it’s like the guy looking for his keys under the streetlight. Reductive materialists are under the streetlight because that’s where they can see things.

But in fact, if you’re keys are lost out in the darkness, the techniques there are no good. It is only by letting go of that reductive materialism and opening up to what is a far more profound understanding of consciousness. This is where I think for me as a scientist, I look at quantum mechanics and I go into this in great detail in my book, is a huge part of the smoking gun. It shows us that there’s something going on there about consciousness that our primitive models don’t get. It’s far more profound than I ever realized before.

That’s where I’m coming from because my experience showed me very clearly that incredibly powerful consciousness far beyond what I’m trapped in here in the earthly realm begins to emerge as you get rid of that filtering mechanism of the brain. It is really astonishing. And that is what we need to explain. Thousands or millions of near-death experiencers have talked about this.

Not only that but as you mentioned a few minutes ago, people don’t even have to go to a near-death situation. There are plenty of mystical experiences that have occurred over millennia that are part of the same mechanism. That’s why all this talk about oxygen, tension, CO2 and all that you can pretty much throw out the window. You really need to be working towards explaining all of those phenomena. Part of the problem is they’re hard to explain but that is a clue.

Willy Lomans was asked, “Why do you rob banks?” He said, “Because that’s where the money is.” Well, same kind of thing. They are hard issues and the whole understanding of what consciousness really involves. I came a lot closer to that in my coma experience and coming out of it and in doing all the very intense homework for the three years since then to try and understand it. It’s a difficult question because it’s close to the real truth that we’re going after. If it were easy it would be widely available. It would already have been written up by somebody who wanted to publish or perish. That’s not how it works. It’s not that easy.

Alex Tsakiris: Dr. Alexander, in the little bit of time we have left what’s it been like being so public about your experience?

Dr. Eben Alexander: Well, many people have come up to me and said, “Wow, this takes a lot of courage to do this.” You know, it probably would have taken courage to talk like this right after I came out of it. I learned to put the lid on it but then as I did more and more work and talked with more people and started realizing, “Oh my gosh, this is all real.” Then I can tell you, it takes no courage at all. It simply is so powerful to know this.

One thing I’m trying to do in my book is to show why it’s so logical, why this is a very rational way for things to work, especially when you really delve into the profound mystery of conscious existence. Again, I’d recommend Irreducible Mind to any people with a scientific bent who really want to get into it.

Go in there because the whole issue is far, far deeper than we would like to think. It’s absolutely wonderful to realize this. I think it’s going to change this world in wonderful ways. But a big part of it, of course, is to try and broaden the boundaries of science and of what we accept and will use to get towards truth. I’m very hopeful that science and spirituality will come together hand-in-hand and go forward to help with getting these answers and help people to understand the true nature of our existence. A side effect will be that humanity and the grace and harmony that we will see around this world will expand tremendously as we move forward in that fashion.

Alex Tsakiris: Great. It’s certainly an amazing account and you do a great job of bringing forth this information. We wish you the best of luck with that and we’ll certainly look forward to your book, coming out when? Probably next year maybe?

Dr. Eben Alexander: I certainly hope so. I’m hoping to finish it now. I do have a web page which is lifebeyonddeath.net for any people who have an interest. I tell you, I’m so busy on the book. You can send me email or sign up for the newsletter or whatever, but I won’t be responding for a few months. If people are interested, they’re welcome to get in touch and sign up for the newsletter, which won’t come out until I’m done on the book. Then we’ll move from there.

It’s just a wonderful gift and I think people will see that it actually makes more sense than anything else has so far. That’s why I think it’s of inestimable value to get this out to the world.

Alex Tsakiris: Thanks so much for joining us today.

Dr. Eben Alexander: Thank you very much. I appreciate it, Alex.

LIVE NEVER END – Death is a change of state, freeing the soul from the prison of the body, but also the possibility to promote the soul on a scale of love, just while living within the limits and tests of the body bestial we are able to study and promote the soul. There is a long line of souls in the afterlife waiting to return to this world that didn’t completed their studies and can not bear the shame for their actions in previous lives. Because everything is known to all, only in this world, the real world while no one know the real truth, we can change the future and atone for the past. So why not start now, when he has the time? There is only one thing to be learned … How to Love – ourselves and equally all of us …

Proof Of Heaven: A Neurosurgeon’s Journey Into The Afterlife with Dr. Eben Alexander III

Alexander

 

Near Death Experiences – NDE proves we have life out side our body


near-death-experiences-explained

near-death-experiences-explained

Near Death Experiences,

A near-death experience (NDE) refers to a subjective experience that some people undergo, after being declared clinically dead or are in a situation where death is expected. The term was coined by Dr. Raymond Moody in 1975 in his book, “Life After Life“. Many near-death experiencers (NDErs), however, have said that the term ‘near-death’ is not correct because they are sure that they were in death, not just near-death.

pleasurable NDEs, involving feelings of love, joy, peace, and/or bliss, as reported by most NDErs; andNear-death experiencers (NDErs) have reported 2 types of experiences:

  • distressing NDEs, involving feelings of terror, horror, anger, isolation, and/or guilt, as reported by a small number of NDErs.
  • Both types of NDErs usually report that the experience is hyper-real, even more real than earthly life. These experiences, however, have been described in medical journals as having the characteristics of hallucinations. Notwithstanding, parapsychologists, religious believers, and a number of scientists have pointed to them as evidence of an afterlife and mind-body dualism.

With recent developments in cardiac resuscitation techniques, the number of reported NDEs has increased. According to a Gallup poll, approx. 8 million Americans claim to have had a near-death experience. This number, however, may be underestimated, as some NDErs may not feel comfortable discussing their experience with others, due in part to NDE being perceived as a paranormal experience.

NDEs are presently studied in the fields of psychology, psychiatry, and hospital medicine.

Four Phases of a Pleasurable Near-Death Experience: The International Association for Near-Death Studies identified 4 phases that tend to happen in a certain order (although it can also occur in any order):

  • Dissociative phase: NDErs no longer feel associated with their physical bodies or with any particular perspective. They feel detached and completely peaceful, without seeing, hearing, or feeling anything in particular. Sometimes, they also describe a floating sense of freedom from pain and of complete well-being.
  • Naturalistic phase: NDErs become aware of their bodies and the surrounding area from a perspective outside their bodies. Things look and sound like normal, but are unusually clear and vivid. NDErs also often say they had unusual abilities, such as being able to see through walls, and being able to ‘hear’ the unspoken thoughts of people nearby.
  • Supernatural phase: NDErs meet beings and environments that are not part of the natural world. Communication with these beings, such as their deceased loved ones or other non-physical entities, is ‘mind to mind’, rather than spoken. NDErs say they went to an extremely beautiful environment in which objects appeared lit from within and sometimes, they also hear beautiful music, unlike any worldly music they’d ever heard. Often, they also say that they moved rapidly through a tunnel or void toward a light and on entering the light, discovered that the light was actually a being which knew and loved them completely. Some NDErs also underwent a ‘life review’, reexperiencing and experiencing being on the receiving end of all their actions throughout life.
  • Phase of returning to the physical body: About half of the NDErs say they chose whether or not to return. When they chose to return, it was because of a love connection with one or more living people. The other half say they did not choose to return, but were either told or made to return, or else they were just suddenly back in their bodies.
  •  Four Types of Distressing Near-Death Experience: The International Association for Near-Death Studies also identified 4 types of distressing NDEs in descending order from most to least often reported:
  1. Powerlessness type: This group of NDErs experienced the same phases as a pleasurable NDE, but they say they felt powerless, while this experience was happening to them, so they resisted and were either afraid or angry.
  2. Nothingness type: This group of NDErs felt as though they did not exist, or they were completely alone in a total and eternal void.
  3. Torment type: This group of NDErs say that they were in ugly or scary landscapes, sometimes with evil beings, annoying noises, frightening creatures, and/or other human spirits in great distress.
  4. Worthlessness type: This is the least common of the 4 types of distressing NDEs in which the NDEr felt negatively judged by a Higher Power during a life review.
  5. Some distressing NDErs said that once they gave up fighting the distressing NDE and surrendered to it, or once they sincerely asked for help from a loving Higher Power, their distressing NDE became a pleasurable one. The reverse in which a pleasurable NDE turned into a distressing one is extremely rare.

 Blind Woman Can See During Near Death Experience Pim Lommel NDE

 

Here are some sientifc reaserching about NDE 

Near-death_experience

Near-death_experience

A surge of electrical activity in the brain could be responsible for the vivid experiences described by near-death survivors, scientists report.
A study carried out on dying rats found high levels of brainwaves at the point of the animals’ demise.

US researchers said that in humans this could give rise to a heightened state of consciousness.  The research is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The lead author of the study, Dr Jimo Borjigin, of the University of Michigan, said: “A lot of people thought that the brain after clinical death was inactive or hypoactive, with less activity than the waking state, and we show that is definitely not the case. “If anything, it is much more active during the dying process than even the waking state.”
From bright white lights to out-of-body sensations and feelings of life flashing before their eyes, the experiences reported by people who have come close to death but survived are common the world over.
However, studying this in humans is a challenge, and these visions are little understood.

To find out more, scientists at the University of Michigan monitored nine rats as they were dying.

In the 30-second period after the animal’s hearts stopped beating, they measured a sharp increase in high-frequency brainwaves called gamma oscillations.
These pulses are one of the neuronal features that are thought to underpin consciousness in humans, especially when they help to “link” information from different parts of the brain. In the rats, these electrical pulses were found at even higher levels just after the cardiac arrest than when animals were awake and well.
Dr Borjigin said it was feasible that the same thing would happen in the human brain, and that an elevated level of brain activity and consciousness could give rise to near-death visions.

1. Schizophrenia, dissociative anaesthesia and near-death experience; three events meeting at the NMDA receptor.
Med Hypotheses 2004;62(1):23-8 (ISSN: 0306-9877)
Department of Pharmacology, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The, Netherlands.

The three events, viz. schizophrenia, dissociative anaesthesia and Near-Death Experience, despite their seemingly unrelated manifestation to each other, have nevertheless similar functional basis. All three events are linked to the glutamate sensitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex, which serves as their common functional denominator. Arguments and speculations are presented in favor of the view that, the three events might be considered as functional models of each other. Antagonism to the recognition NMDA-site of the receptor induces dissociative anaesthesia and precipitates Near-Death Experience. Agonist reinforcement at the modulatory glycine-site of the receptor counteracts negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Both types of challenges towards the receptor are compatible with a glutamate deficiency concept which underlies the meeting of the three events at the NMDA receptor.

2. Near-death experiences and the temporal lobe.
Psychol Sci 2004 Apr;15(4):254-8 (ISSN: 0956-7976)
Britton WB; Bootzin RR
Department of Psychology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA.

Many studies in humans suggest that altered temporal lobe functioning, especially functioning in the right temporal lobe, is involved in mystical and religious experiences. We investigated temporal lobe functioning in individuals who reported having transcendental “near-death experiences” during life-threatening events. These individuals were found to have more temporal lobe epileptiform electroencephalographic activity than control subjects and also reported significantly more temporal lobe epileptic symptoms. Contrary to predictions, epileptiform activity was nearly completely lateralized to the left hemisphere. The near-death experience was not associated with dysfunctional stress reactions such as dissociation, posttraumatic stress disorder, and substance abuse, but rather was associated with positive coping styles. Additional analyses revealed that near-death experiencers had altered sleep patterns, specifically, a shorter duration of sleep and delayed REM sleep relative to the control group. These results suggest that altered temporal lobe functioning may be involved in the near-death experience and that individuals who have had such experiences are physiologically distinct from the general population.

3. Near-death experiences with reports of meeting deceased people.
Death Stud 2001 Apr-May;25(3):229-49 (ISSN: 0748-1187)
Kelly EW
University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA.

Few scientists have taken seriously the interpretation of near-death experiences (NDEs) as evidence for survival after death, even though most people having such an experience have become convinced that they will survive death and several features of NDEs are at least suggestive of survival. This article compares survival and some nonsurvival interpretations of NDEs in light of one feature suggestive of survival, that of reports of having seen deceased persons during the NDE. Several features of 74 NDEs involving such reports were compared with those of 200 NDEs not involving such reports. Although some of the findings could support either a survival or a nonsurvival interpretation, several other findings may weaken the primary nonsurvival hypothesis, that of expectation. Additionally, the convergence of several features suggesting survival and the convergence of features that require multiple kinds of alternative explanations, in individual cases as well as in large groups of cases, warrant our considering the survival hypothesis of NDEs more seriously than most scientists currently do.

4. What Emergency Department Staff Need to Know About Near-Death Experiences
Debbie James. Topics in Emergency Medicine.
Jan-Mar 2004.Vol.26, Iss. 1; pg. 29, 6 pgs

A CASE TO REMEMBER

J.B., a 42-year-old white man, was taken to the Emergency Department (ED) by emergency medical services (EMS) after he was resuscitated at his son’s high school football game. He had suddenly collapsed and 2 bystanders started Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), which was continued until paramedics arrived 5 minutes later. he was placed on a cardiac monitor, defibrillated, intubated, and transported once an IV was in place and a rhythm established. Upon arrival, J.B. had 2 more episodes of ventricular fibrillation, which was treated according to the Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) protocol. he was transferred to the coronary care unit within the next 2 hours. Over the subsequent 24 hours, J.B. was stabilized, extubated, and closely monitored.

Two days later he asked his nurse to explain what had happened to him because he recalled “dreams” about how the paramedics had intervened with him at the game and how the ED staff had participated in his resuscitation. The nurse nervously stated that she was not at liberty to discuss his resuscitative care and encouraged him to consult his cardiologist about any concerns. J.B. did not inquire further about his “dreams.”

Two years later, J.B. attended a cardiac rehabilitation support group meeting and heard the guest speaker present the topic of near-death experiences (NDEs). he was shocked to learn that several people in the group had vivid memories of “dreams” they had following their resuscitation. J.B. became emotional and fought the urge to ask the speaker questions regarding his close brush with death. he had not allowed himself to discuss the subject though the memories were as clear that night as they were 2 years prior. Before he realized it he was asking the speaker about his memory of hearing one paramedic saying to the other, “Hurry up, crank it up to 200.. .we’re losing him, we’re losing him!” he continued to divulge that he felt something funny and then heard the paramedic yell, “Hurry up dammit, crank it up to 300; we’re losing this guy.”

After J.B. had recounted the 200-300-360 sequence, the speaker explained that he had just given the exact energy settings that health care providers are taught to use to defibrillate patients. J.B. innocently asked, “then you think it happened like that?” The speaker compassionately responded, “I think it happened exactly like that” as she saw others in the group wiping tears from their eyes.

J.B. is one of the estimated 10 million Americans who has reported a near-death experience (NDE) associated with resuscitation. he had an immediate desire to disclose the NDE but based on the reaction of the person he first chose to tell, he suppressed any further desire to share.

DEFINITION OF NEAR-DEATH EXPERIENCE

Absolute consensus on the definition of the NDE among researchers has not been reached though most will agree that it is one of the most powerful emotional and psychological events known. For the last 3 decades, the term NDE typically describes a close brush with physical, psychological, emotional, and/or spiritual death. Pirn van Lommel, Dutch cardiologist, recently defined the NDE as “the reported memory of all impressions during a special state of consciousness.”

CHARACTERISTICS

Survivors often recall certain characteristics about their close brush with death. The most common characteristics include, but are not limited to, a bright light, encountering others, the presence of Deity, and peace and/or an understanding of love and knowledge. Van Lommel1 notes that specific elements of the NDE include an out-of-body (OOB) experience, pleasant feelings, and seeing a tunnel, a light, deceased relatives, or a life review.

STAGES OF THE NDE

Consensus about the stages of the NDE has also not been reached, probably due to the fact that no two NDEs are identical; however, patterns have emerged as patients report their experience. A composite of the stages described across cultures and centuries might include euphoria, an OOB experience, a tunnel experience, an unearthly world of light, and a decision-making period.

* Euphoria-a floating, peaceful feeling. Most report that they had no human wants or needs. They were not hungry, thirsty, in pain, hot, or cold.

* Out-of-body experience-a separation of body and spirit. Reports most commonly include watching the body from an outward perspective, feeling little to no attachment to the physical self.

* Tunnel experience-being pulled into a dark hole or the center of the earth. Some feel they were in a black vastness and/or moving quickly toward the center.

* An unearthly world of light-being in surroundings that are not of this earth. Some report seeing objects and beings that are unfamiliar or have features of light. Sounds such, as music, have also been noted in this stage.

* The decision-making period-being involved in the decision to stay or return. Some report knowing or being told that “it is not time” or that “you must go back” or being given the choice to return or not.

These stages are certainly not experienced by every person who has had an NDE. Some people report being in a bright light or a dark tunnel and having a “knowing” that they must return and that is the entire experience. Others describe all the stages of the event in elaborate detail.

LITERATURE REVIEW

For hundreds of years, people have reported stories related to their close encounters with death. Notations may be found in The Bible, The Tibetan Book of the Dead, and many widely read sources, but not until 1975 was the term Near-Death Experience used to describe such encounters. Moody published Life After Life, a book containing stories and accounts revealed to him by over 100 people. he was criticized for his “nonscientiflc” study by other researchers. Moody’s work has been accepted as the foundation upon which others have based their research. he identified perceptions frequently described by patients who had been successfully resuscitated. These include but are not limited to

* feelings of separation of mind from body

* sensations of drifting, floating, passing through solid objects

* awareness of actual events but an inability to communicate to living beings

* hearing loud, hissing, thunderous noises

* moving through a tunnel

* meeting a brilliant, warm Light

* experiencing peace, indescribable beauty, splendor, and a longing to be part of it

* recognizing others

* communication with deceased others by thoughts

* returning through darkness, propelled by force

* feeling a purpose about life

Kubler-Ross3 subsequently included this phenomenon in her publications related to aspects of death and dying. She reported anecdotes of deathbed visions, visits, and stories. The patients sharing these anecdotes described many perceptions which had been identified by Moody.

The first scientific study of NDEs was documented by Ring4 in 1980. he found that in a sample of 102 people who came close to death, 49 described an NDE that fit the core experience concept. Of the 102 subjects, 61 appeared to be unable to verbalize language to describe the feelings, perceptions, and time frame of the NDE.

Articles in the medical literature in the late seventies and early eighties primarily reported qualitative studies which focused on “stories”from patients who had close brushes with death. Sabom5 reported “recollections” of patients in his practice who had suffered a myocardial infarction. They too, recounted many of the same characteristics cited by Moody.

George Gallup reported a landmark study conducted by the prestigious Gallup Poll. He reported that “approximately 35 percent of those persons who have come close to death undergo an NDE.”6

Greyson noted a lack of quantitative measures of the NDE and its components and introduced an NDE Scale. The 16-item final questionnaire resulted from an original 33-item tool Greyson developed after identifying 80 manifestations characteristic of an NDE. he used cluster analysis to reveal 3 factor clusters, which are transcendental, affective, and cognitive NDEs. Greyson reported that “this reliable, valid, and easily administered scale is clinically useful in differentiating NDEs from organic brain syndrome, and nonspecific stress responses. “7(p569)

Oakes, in 1978, published a 3-part segment entitled The Lazarus Syndrome in RN magazine. Here she reported the first nursing research study that focused on “what patients perceive in near-death events.”8(p55) She noted that “strong cultural influences and religious beliefs affect a patient’s expectation of what death will bring; and that this is reflected in the dying process.”8(p56) Oakes concluded her 2-year study, in which she interviewed 21 postresuscitation patients, with a Care Plan for the Unique Needs of Those Who’ve Died.8(p60) The care plan included 5 major guidelines to consider when CPR becomes necessary. The first suggestion helped guide care when a patient is in cardiac arrest and apparently unconscious. Specific interventions included avoidance of threatening language, reassurance about care, and incorporation of comforting touch. The second guideline related to caring for patients who become unconscious. Reassurance and support, reality orientation, and care during transfer to intensive care unit (ICU) are recommended for the plan of care. Establishment of a low stress environment, which included considerations about personal care items, privacy, verbal support, was the third care plan item. The fourth guideline dealt ‘with interventions regarding the post-CPR reports of NDE. Attention and active listening, nonjudgmental behavior, assistance in exploring the event, and documentation were discussed and encouraged in this section. Lastly, methods for follow-up care were reviewed. Care plan items included assessment of the impact on the patient, intervention with the family, and long-term support.

Orne reported her findings related to nurses’ attitudes about NDEs and what they considered appropriate interventions. Results indicated “listening to NDE accounts and encouraging discussion” ranked highest among responses.9(p420) She concluded her study with a list of research questions which need to be answered. Two of these provided foundation for this study. They included “Is coping influenced by what is (or is not) said or done by nurses?” and “What strategies are most needed: reassurance, information, invitations to talk and explore feelings, or referral?”

Corcoran10 presented insights on how to best provide care for patients who have had an NDE. She reviewed the phenomenon, characteristics, incidence, and aftereffects. In addition, she provided a new concept. Research has shown that “NDEs have fairly common characteristics around the world, so, if an NDE is a hallucination, it must be a universal hallucination.”10(p36) She urged nurses to carefully listen to patients’ information regarding their experience without judgment.

Currently several researchers are exploring various aspects of the NDE and reporting the data in the Journal of Near Death Studies as well as major medical journals such as lancet.

AFTEREFFECTS OF THE NDE

Recognizing that no two NDEs are the same, it would stand to reason that the aftereffects of the NDE are unique as well. However, there are certain aftereffects that are reported more frequently than others. The most common of these include having no fear of death, less regard for material wealth, chemical sensitivities, and difficult disclosure decisions.

No fear of death

Though many state that they are not eager to die or separate from loved ones, they see death from a different perspective and therefore accept it as a part of life. Additionally, individuals who have suffered chronic pain and have an NDE often become more comfortable with death knowing that it will bring peace and comfort. On the surface, realizing that a patient may have an acceptance of death especially when death is imminent and suffering has become more apparent might bring comfort to caregivers and loved ones. However, if the patient is a small child who-now accepts death when his parents and family have not reached the same point can be very difficult for all concerned. Healthcare providers also may feel conflicted when the patient seems unconcerned about the possibility of death. Patients who request that no resuscitative efforts be taken in their plan of care may meet resistance from their health care team.

Less regard for material wealth

Near-death survivors often report a decreased desire for material wealth as they note an increase in the importance of relationships. Affluent near-death experiencers (NDEers) explain that the need for money, resources, and even fame no longer drives their behavior. As they integrate the experience and such a significant change in philosophy, they find loved ones have difficulty in accepting them as well as their life goals. Unfortunately, studies have shown that the divorce rate for NDEers is higher than the national average. Individuals who have strivecl to meet personal, financial, and spiritual goals suddenly find themselves on divided paths. For the near-death survivor the path may be lonely but acceptable.

Increased chemical sensitivity

Near-death survivors report strange reactions to certain chemicals following the NDE. Individuals state that they no longer enjoy drinking alcohol, experience hypersensitivity to medications they have used for years, as well as encounter unusual reactions to dyes used for diagnostic procedures. Problems associated with such sensitivities may include physical compromise in addition to delays in treatment when health care providers do not understand and/or accept the phenomenon.

Difficult disclosure decisions

Multiple factors which influence decision making regarding disclosure of the NDE were documented by James.11 These factors included considerations related to timing of the disclosure, the individual(s) to be told, motives for sharing the experience, as well as motives which lead to nondisclosure.

Timing of the disclosure

With regard to when the NDE is disclosed to another, James found that the NDEer may attempt to discuss part of the phenomenon immediately after the experience, or as soon as he/she can communicate, simply to validate that he/she was as close to death as was perceived. An in-depth discussion of the actual experience may not be the desire of the NDEer at such time because he/she may not understand what occurred and time may be needed for acceptance of the circumstances which led to the NDE. On the other hand, NDEers may desire to talk about the actual experience soon after the event to share with a loved one the beauty, peace, and joy of the experience. NDEers report attempting to share their story immediately, but felt as though others “did not understand, were not interested, or thought they were crazy or confused.” NDEers who do not attempt to share their story immediately report trying to tell someone as soon as they felt they “needed or wanted to. ” On the basis of the reaction of the confidant, the NDEer may wait years before disclosure may be possible.

Individuals chosen for disclosure

James concluded from her data that the NDEer will most likely attempt to tell a nurse or physician about the NDE regardless of the timing. The primary reason is because these individuals are more apt to understand the severity of the situation or condition. The next choice is typically a family member; however, a greater risk may be perceived as disclosure may impact a long-term relationship.

Motives for disclosure and nondisclosure

Motives for disclosure include the need for support or information, and because someone cared. Motives for nondisclosure are personal issues and noncaring behaviors. Personal issues may include that the NDEer feels it is not practical to share for various reasons or that he/she has negative feelings about the listener.

SUMMARY

The NDE is not uncommon, but is so profound and personal that often the experiencer desires to disclose the event immediately after it occurs. This desire frequently results in an attempt to share the event with those responsible for the care of the experiencer. Health care professionals are often in a position to promote a path of physical and spiritual health and well-being. Therefore, their increased awareness and sensitivity of the needs of the NDEer are essential.

The need to create a healing environment was first documented by Florence Nightingale12 in I860 in her Notes on Nursing. In many cases, the NDE occurs in a health care setting, such as a hospital, ambulance, or clinic, wherein the nurses and physicians, and sometimes clergy and family, are immediately available to the NDEer. Health care professionals play a key role in the promotion of an environment of healing.

The decision as to which individual(s) the experiencer will select for disclosure depends primarily on the demonstration of specific caring behaviors of the caregiver. The NDEer must recognize the promotion of a safe environment before sharing is possible. The response to the first attempt at disclosure will have a serious impact on future disclosure decisions.

RECOMMENDATIONS

Possible interventions for ED staff caring for patients who have had an NDE might include but are not limited to the following:

* Actively listen to verbal and nonverbal communication. The patient may desire to share very personal data and may be searching for permission to proceed. Remain alert to phrases like “I had a strange dream,” or “a weird thing happened.”

* Foster a caring environment. Use positive language and pleasant tones of voice. Promote a healing atmosphere in every aspect of patient care. Realize that even in resuscitation efforts patients may be aware of certain behaviors.

* Listen. Allow the patient to describe what is on his mind and do not interrupt with explanations about drugs and hypoxia. Remain nonjudgmental.

* Be there. NDEers state that they told “the nurse show was really there.” Make eye contact, slow down, look at the patient, and ask about their feelings. Hold the patient’s hand and listen. Care.

* Research. Conduct research regarding the impact of specific interventions used in the care of the survivors of near-death events.

* Allow the patient/NDEer to decide how to proceed. Respect the confidentiality of the experiencer. If he/she would like assistance in discussing the NDE with the family, assist. If he/she asks about resources, refer to the local FOI (Friends of International Association of Near-Death Studies) Chapter.

* Prepare the patient who will undergo life-threatening procedures or surgery. If the patient has had a serious compromise during a procedure, be alert for clues and ask open-ended question. Establish a safe environment.

* Answer questions. Recognize the fact that many NDEers question their own sanity and need support and information. Reorient as needed. Listen. Explain that “sometimes people who have had this type of injury or illness have told about interesting feelings or dreams.” Open the door. Validate the severity of their illness or injury.

* Inform colleagues. Assist other health care providers in understanding the significance of the NDE and the support the experiencer needs.

* Utilize available resources. For further information, such as frightening NDEs, NDEs in children, and additional aftereffects, contact the International Association for Near-Death Studies at http://www.IANDS.org.

* Share the story. Share NDEer’s stories with those who survive close brushes with death. Listen.

Near Death Experience Documentary – commonalities of the experience

Neurosurgeon Dr. Eben Alexander Discusses His Near Death Experience and His Book ‘Proof of Heaven’

 

REFERENCES

1. van Lommel P, van Wees R1 Meyers V, Elffcrich I. Near death experience in survivors of cardiac arrest: a prospective study in the Netherlands. Lancet. 2001;358:2040.
2. Moody R. Life After Life. New York: Bantam; 1975.
3. Kublcr-Ross E. To Live Until We Say Good-Bye. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall; 1978.
4. Ring. 1980.
5. Sabom MB. Recollections of Death: A Medical Investigation. New York: Harper & Row; 1982.
6. Gallup G. Adventures in Immortality. New York: McGraw-Hill; 1982.
7. Greyson B. The near-death experience scale: construction, reliability, and validity. J Nerv Ment Dis. 1983:171:369-375.
8. Oakes AR. The Lazarus syndrome: eare for patients who’ve returned from the dead. RN. 1978;4l:54.
9. Orne R. Nurses’ views of NDEs. Am J Nurs. 1986;4:419-420.
10. Corcoran D. Helping patients who’ve had near-death experiences. Nursing 88. 1988;ll:34-39.
11. James DL. Factors in the Nursing Environment Which Promote Disclosure of Near-Death Experiences [thesis]. San Antonio, Tex: Incarnate Word College; 1994:74-79.
12. Nightingale F. Notes on Nursing: What il is and What it is Not. London: Harrison; I860.

Debbie James, MSN, RN, CCRN, CNS
From The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Tex.

How did I proved to my self I have a soul…


 out of your body in OBE

When you just get out of your body in OBE process it may look like this

Though I’m attracted to the mystical aspects of the life, I’m in my nature very skeptic and never take things as facts just cause some one say they are, but if it really interesting me, I will do anything in my power to prove or dismiss it my self. Such is the case with the question many ask themselves ( I suppose… ) so how did I find out that I have soul ? Who say there is soul any way? How can anyone prove it ?

Well it turn out there is a way – OBE ( out of body experience ) While it may occur spontaneously or in near death experiences, there is a way in specific meditation, to actually get out of the body, I did it 4 times, till at the forth time, I met an angel… so here I got 2 birds in one test. 😉 well it turn out ( as the angel transmit this info to me ) I was not ready to do such out of body travels, so I got last warnings from this angel, to never try it again, if I want to ever come back to life… I will post about all this also..

OK, so now from this I know there are souls and angels, and what I know about soulmates ?

Well if there are souls and I wasn’t ready to travel out of my body any more, it’s mean one thing, the souls are in the bodies for get ready… ready for what? you would ask,.. Well this I knew from my last travel also, as I went up and outside my house via the roof ( for the first time by the way ), to the sky and looked up there was no sky, well not the one we normally used to see, it was all bright light radiate the feeling of love, and I felt so small and such a nothing beside it, but I wanted to go upper into it and be part of this endless love, but then right after, I saw this angel beside me, so from this I knew I wasnt ready for all the love and need to learn much more about it and become love, so I will be able to stay there, cause it is all I wished for, to be there inside this endless feeling of love, that nothing like that exist in life, the only feeling that can come slightly close to it happen, when you are in love, in deep love, when you hug your love one you may feel this divine feeling of love, between you, uniting you in this divine feeling of love, such feeling I do have with my soulmate, that I recently found, and this also happened because of my research into the spiritual aspects of life… So here again I know soulmates is a real thing, because I’m living in love with one of my soulmates, I wrote about soulmates in my first article here: https://soulmatelove.wordpress.com/2014/09/06/how-to-find-your-soulmate-love/

With my soulmate Natalya Markova

With my soulmate Natalya Markova

Here is more information about the OBE if some one wish to try it… and you can contact me if you’ll need help with this…

The Out-Of-Body Experience (OBE)

An out-of-body experience is a condition usually occurring spontaneously during meditation, deep sleep, hypnosis, shamanic trance, sensory-deprivation, anesthesia, extreme illness or trauma, in which one finds themselves outside their physical body, yet remaining fully conscious and perceiving everything normally.  Robert Monroe describes it as“an altered state of consciousness in which the subject feels that hismind or self-awareness is separated from his physical body and this self-awareness has a vivid and real sense about it, quite different from a dream.”

The experience typically begins by finding yourself floating over or standing next to your physical body, perceiving normally, but with a great feeling of lightness and power.  You may see your physical body lying on the bed or you may just rise straight up through the ceiling.  You may have a ghostly, astral body which can fly around or you may be a point of pure consciousness which can travel instantaneously to wherever you think about.

Some individuals describe themselves as amorphous clouds, energy patterns, or pure consciousness; others experience distinct feelings of having a body which is, however, permeable, invisible, and inaudible for those in the phenomenal world. Sometimes there is fear, confusion, and a tendency to return to the physical body; sometimes there are ecstatic feelings of timelessness, weightlessness, peace, serenity, and tranquility. Some individuals in this state show concern about the fate of their physical bodies; others feel totally indifferent.”  -Stanislav Grof & Joan Halifax, “Human Encounter with Death” (154)

You can move through space (and time) slowly or apparently somewhere beyond the speed of light. You can observe, participate in events, make willful decisions based upon what you perceive and do. You can move through physical matter such as walls, steel plates, concrete, earth, oceans, air, even atomic radiation without effort or effect. You can go into an adjoining room without bothering to open the door. You can visit a friend three thousand miles away. You can explore the moon, the solar system, and the galaxy if these interest you. Or you can enter other reality systems only dimly perceived and theorized by our time/space consciousness.”  –Robert Monroe, “Far Journeys”

Most OBEs have common features.  They all typically begin while in an altered state of consciousness your awareness shifts to a point outside your physical body.  The physical body is usually seen dormant on the bed (or wherever you left it) while a second, astral body is seen attached to your new space of awareness.  This light, ghostly body can pass through walls or solid objects, float/fly around, and is sometimes even seen by other people.

In the OOBE, the individual is near-totally conscious … Most if not all of your physical sensory perception is replicated. You can ‘see,’ ‘hear,’ and ‘touch’ – the weakest seem to be smell and taste. Your perspective is from a position outside your physical body, near or distant. In a near state, it is usually from a location impossible for you to ‘be’ with your physical body, such as floating against the ceiling. In a far location, it could be in Paris when you know you are in New York physically. You can observe events taking place, but you cannot change or significantly affect them. You can verify the authenticity of such events subsequently if you so desire.” –Robert Monroe, “Far Journeys”

OBE’s have been reported throughout history by people of all ages and cultures.  The soul-body or astral-body was known as the “ka” to ancient Egyptians, the “siddhi” to Indians, and the “bardo-body” to Tibetans. OBEs are the main subject matter, described in detail in the Egyptian and Tibetan Books of the Dead.  St. Paul seems to describe an OBE in second Corinthians chapter twelve.  Ernst Hemmingway wrote about witnessing his soul leave his physical body and float around after being hit by shrapnel in 1918.

Aldous Huxley, Goethe, D. H. Lawrence, August Strindberg, and Jack London all reported having OBEs.  They were known to the Egyptians, the North American Indians, the Chinese, the Greek philosophers, the medieval alchemists, the Oceanic peoples, the Hindus, the Hebrews, and the Moslems.  In a cross-cultural study of 44 non-Western societies, Dean Shiels found that only three did not hold a belief in OBEs.  Erika Bourguignon looked at 488 world societies – or roughly 57 percent of all known societies – and found that 437 of them, or 89 percent, had at least some tradition regarding OBEs … Dr. Robert Crookall, a geologist at the University of Aberdeen and an amateur parapsychologist, investigated enough cases to fill nine books on the subject.”  -Michael Talbot, “The Holographic Universe”

It is quite well known, for example, that many cultures attribute to shamans the capacity to fly out of the body. In fact, a shaman cannot be anointed as such unless he has that capacity. According to Eliade, such flights express ‘intelligent understanding of secret things, metaphysical truths, symbolic meaning, transcendence, and freedom.’” –Robert Monroe, “Far Journeys” (278)

Many surveys have also been conducted in recent years testing the prevalence of the OBE phenomenon.  In 1954 Dr. Hornell Hart of Duke University surveyed 115 of his students and found that 27 of them had experienced an OBE at least once.  A 1966 study by Celia Green showed that 19% of students asked at Southampton University had had one.  A 1968 Green15 survey reported that 34% of 380 Oxford undergraduates had experienced an OBE.  Palmer and Dennis’ 1975 study randomly selected a group of 1,000 students and townspeople in a small Virginia town resulting in 25% of the students, and 14% of the townspeople answering affirmatively.  Erlendur Haraldsson’s random survey of 902 adults found 8% had been out of their bodies at least once.  And a 1980 survey by Dr. Harvey Irwin at the University of New England in Australia found 20% of his 177 had experienced out-of-body travel.  All results pooled together, it seems an average of about 1 in 7 people experiences an OBE at least once during their lives.

First, OOBEs are a universal human experience, not in the sense that  they happen to large numbers of people, but in that they have happened all through recorded history, and there are marked similarities in the experience among people who are otherwise extremely different in terms of cultural background. One can find reports of OOBEs by housewives in Kansas which closely resemble accounts of OOBEs from ancient Egyptian or oriental sources.  Second, the OOBE is generally a once-in-a-lifetime experience, seemingly experienced by ‘accident.’ Illnesses sometimes bring it about, especially illnesses which are almost fatal. Great emotional stress sometimes brings it about. In many cases, it simply happens during sleep without our having any idea of what might have caused it. In very rare instances it seems to have been brought about by a deliberate attempt. Third, the experience of an OOBE is usually one of the most profound experiences of a person’s life, and radically alters his beliefs. This is usually expressed as, ‘I no longer [merely] believe in survival of death or an immortal soul, I know that I will survive death.’ The person feels that he has directly experienced being alive and conscious without his physical body, and therefore knows that he possesses some kind of soul that will survive bodily death.”  –Robert Monroe, “Journeys Out of the Body”

In Robert Monroe’s book “Far Journeys” he shares many recorded accounts of OBEs including the following: “When I was approximately ten years old I was living together with my older brother at my uncle’s house, a major in the U.S. Army Medical Corps. One day I was reclined on my bed quite awake and was looking at the ceiling beams of the old Spanish building where the living quarters were located. I was saying to myself many questions such as what was I doing there and who was I. All of a sudden I get up from the bed and start walking toward the next room. At that moment I felt a strange sensation in me; it was a sensation of weightlessness and a strange mix of a sense of a feeling of joy. I turned back in my steps in order to go back to bed when to my big surprise I saw myself reclined on the bed. This surprising experience at that very small age gave me the kind of a jerk which, so to say, shook me back to my body.”

When talking about these subjects at work I found that one of my colleagues, while under anesthesia for an operation, found himself out-of-body hovering against the ceiling in the corner of the Operating Room where he watched his body and the surgeons perform the entire procedure.  It turns out this is actually a fairly common occurrence.  Dr. Michael Rawlings recorded the account of one patient who remembered what the doctor was wearing and what he did during an emergency procedure, which was seemingly impossible because the patient was in a coma at the time.

Out-of-body experience also eventually became a relatively common subject, as more and more surgical patients reported that they witnessed their entire operations and heard everything that was said in the operating room.” -David R. Hawkins, M.D., Ph.D., “Power Vs. Force”

Experiencing an OBE during cardiac arrest is relatively common, so common that Michael B. Sabom, a cardiologist and professor of medicine at Emory University and a staff physician at the Atlanta Veterans’ Administration Medical Center, got tired of hearing his patients recount such ‘fantasies’ and decided to settle the matter once and for all.”  -Michael Talbot, “The Holographic Universe”

Dr. Sabom interviewed 32 chronic cardiac patients who reported having an OBE during their heart attack and the results forever changed his mind about this phenomenon.  He asked them to describe exactly what they remembered happening during the procedure while they were out-of-body:

26 gave correct but general descriptions, 6 gave highly detailed and accurate descriptions of their own resuscitation, and 1 gave a blow-by-blow accounting so accurate that Sabom was stunned.  The results inspired him to delve even deeper into the phenomenon … he has now become an ardent believer and lectures widely on the subject.”  -Michael Talbot, “The Holographic Universe”

In conclusion to his research, Dr. Sabom stated: “[There appears] to be no plausible explanation for the accuracy of these observations involving the usual physical senses.  The out-of-body hypothesis simply seems to fit best with the data at hand.”

There are many people who have reported OBEs in which they saw things that really did happen. The most common of these are the descriptions by patients undergoing surgery, who claim to have witnessed the whole procedure from outside their body. Some have reported details of the procedure that they could not have possibly known, such as where the doctors put gall stones that were removed. Some patients have accurately repeated conversations that went on during the surgery. Skeptics may dismiss such cases by theorizing that some subconscious part of the patient still had cognitive abilities during the operation, and assuming that somehow the patient accessed this subconscious memory when they awoke. This theory cannot explain the less common cases where OBE subjects have reported what was happening in a different room. These seem to suggest that the subject could actually see some part of physical reality.” –Robert Peterson, “Out of Body Experiences”

My fiancé Petchara has also experienced OBEs many times periodically throughout her life. Always during sleep, having drifted off into the subconscious realms, there comes a self-reflexive moment where she finds herself floating in her room with a light-body while fully aware that her physical body is asleep on the bed.  From there she usually leaves through the closed window by her bed and floats over the roofs/houses/roads in her village.  On many occasions she has astrally projected to the houses of classmates, houses she had never visited before, and remembered specific details which were later confirmed true by her shocked classmates.  During one OBE she found herself at her friend Tan’s house and saw orange stairs, a street sign, a van parking lot on one side and a small wooded area on the other, all subsequently confirmed true by Tan.  Another time she found herself apparently outside her friend Oil’s new condo, face to face with a “do not enter” sign on the door and a large swimming pool on the left, both later confirmed to be true.  Not long after meeting me, she astrally traveled to my old house in America where my parents still live and accurately reported the outline, white color, gray tin roof, garage, shelving and flower beds.

I had a spontaneous OBE as a teenager, and after recovering from the shock of finding myself floating over my body and staring down at myself asleep in bed, I had an indescribably exhilarating time flying through walls and soaring over the treetops.  During the course of my bodiless journey I even stumbled across a library book a neighbor had lost and was able to tell her where the book was located the next day.”  -Michael Talbot, “The Holographic Universe”

In Dr. Stanislav Grof’s book “The Holotropic Mind” he shares the account of one Cuban woman who, during cardiac arrest in a Miami hospital, found herself out-of-body back at her old home in Cuba.  She recovered from the heart attack, but came back to her body very agitated about what she had seen while astrally in Cuba.  The people now living in her old home had moved everything around, changed furniture, and painted the fence a shade of green which she hated; all of which were subsequently verified and documented by her curious attending physician.

In Michael Talbot’s “The Holographic Universe” he shares the story of Kimberly Clark, a Seattle hospital social worker who never took OBEs seriously until an incident with a coronary patient named Maria.  One day Maria went into cardiac arrest and found herself hovering against the ceiling watching the doctors and nurses tending to her body.  She watched for a while and then found herself distracted by something over the emergency room driveway.  As soon as she thought about this, she was instantly there hovering outside the hospital:

As soon as she ‘thought herself’ there, she was there.  Next Maria ‘thought her way’ up to the third floor of the building and found herself ‘eyeball to shoelace’ with a tennis shoe.  It was an old shoe and she noticed that the little toe had worn a hole through the fabric.  She also noticed several other details, such as the fact that the lace was stuck under the heel.  After Maria finished her account she begged Clark to please go to the ledge and see if there was a shoe there so that she could confirm whether her experience was real or not.  Skeptical but intrigued … she went up to the third floor and … found a room where she pressed her face against the glass and looked down and saw the tennis shoe. Still, from her vantage point she could not tell if the little toe had worn a place in the shoe or if any of the other details Maria had described were correct.  It wasn’t until she retrieved the shoe that she confirmed Maria’s various observations.  ‘The only way she would have had such a perspective was if she had been floating right outside and at very close range to the tennis shoe,’ states Clark, who has since become a believer in OBEs.  ‘It was very concrete evidence for me.’”  -Michael Talbot, “The Holographic Universe”

In some instances of OOBEs the description of what was happening at a distant place is correct and more accurate than we would expect by coincidence. Not the majority, by any means, but some. To explain these we must postulate either that the ‘hallucinatory’ experience of the OOBE was combined with the operation of ESP, or that in some sense the person really was ‘there.’ The OOBE then becomes very real indeed. The fact that most of our knowledge about OOBEs comes from reports of once-in-a-lifetime experiences puts us at two serious disadvantages. The first of these is that most people cannot produce an OOBE at will, so this precludes the possibility of studying them under precise laboratory conditions. The second disadvantage is that when a person is suddenly thrust for a brief period of time into a very novel environment he may not be a very good observer.” –Robert Monroe, “Journeys Out of the Body”

OBEs are generally sporadic or once-in-a-lifetime phenomena so scientifically verifying their authenticity is an elusive task.  However, with the help of many skilled astral projectors, OBEs have indeed been scientifically documented in the lab.  For instance, in one experiment, parapsychologist Charles Tart wrote a five-digit number on a pad of paper then kept it in a locked room.  In another room an experienced astral traveler laid down, shifted consciousness to her astral body, floated through the wall and accurately reported the number.  In another series of experiments, psychologists Janet Lee Mitchell and Karlis Osis set up a special room for OBE trials at the American Society for Psychical Research in New York.  They placed certain images, objects, and colored geometric patterns in various places around the room, locked it, and then had skilled astral projectors from many places across the country project in and record what they saw.  Many of the participants were able to correctly identify everything in the room.  In another series of experiments, Dr. Robert Morris, director of research at the Psychical Research Foundation in North Carolina, used pets to detect the astral presence of their owners.  For example, during one experiment, a kitten belonging to seasoned astral traveler Keith Harary would always stop meowing and start purring whenever Keith astrally projected into the room.

Some people have mastered the ability well enough to leave their body at will.  One of the most famous of these individuals is a former radio and television executive named Robert Monroe … Monroe began keeping a written journal of his experiences, carefully documenting everything he learned about the out-of-body state.  He discovered he could pass through solid objects and travel great distances in the twinkling of an eye simply by ‘thinking’ himself there.  He found that other people were seldom aware of his presence, although the friends whom he traveled to see while in this ‘second state’ quickly became believers when he accurately described their dress and activity at the time of his out-of-body visit.  He also discovered that he was not alone in his pursuit and occasionally bumped into other disembodied travelers.”  -Michael Talbot, “The Holographic Universe”

As an example of a real-time projection experience, I think of my nephew Matt’s two-week visit back in 1991. During this time, apart from many other activities, I coached Matt on projection. A few days before he was due to leave, while meditating late at night, I clearly saw Matt’s projected real-time double float through the wall and come into the room I was sitting in. He waved cheerfully at me and I slowly waved back at him, without breaking my entranced state – no mean feat in itself – immensely pleased that Matt had finally managed to get out of his body. Matt floated about the room, seemingly having some difficulty with movement and directional control, but apparently thoroughly enjoying himself. He soon floated out of my sight and that was the last I saw of him that night.  The next morning Matt was very excited about his first conscious-exit projection.  He vividly remembered using my technique and feeling heavy vibrations, then leaving his body, moving through the wall and seeing me, and us waving at each other.”  –Robert Bruce, “Astral Dynamics”

Considered as a whole the evidence seems unequivocal.  Although we are taught that we ‘think’ with our brains, this is not always true.  Under the right circumstances our consciousness – the thinking, perceiving part of us – can detach from the physical body and exist just about anywhere it wants to.  Our current scientific understanding cannot account for this phenomenon, but it becomes much more tractable in terms of the holographic idea.  Remember that in a holographic universe, location is itself an illusion.  Just as an image of an apple has no specific location on a piece of holographic film, in a universe that is organized holographically things and objects also possess no definite location; everything is ultimately nonlocal, including consciousness.  Thus, although our consciousness appears to be localized in our heads, under certain conditions it can just as easily appear to be localized in the upper corner of the room, hovering over a grassy lawn, or floating eyeball-to-shoelace with a tennis shoe on the third-floor ledge of a building… If the idea of a nonlocal consciousness seems difficult to grasp, a useful analogy can once again be found in dreaming.  Imagine that you are dreaming you are attending a crowded art exhibit.  As you wander among the people and gaze at the artworks, your consciousness appears to be localized in the head of the person you are in the dream.  But where is your consciousness really?  A quick analysis will reveal that it is actually in everything in the dream, in the other people attending the exhibit, in the artworks, even in the very space of the dream.  In a dream, location is also an illusion because everything – people, objects, space, consciousness, and so on – is unfolding out of the deeper and more fundamental reality of the dreamer.”  -Michael Talbot, “The Holographic Universe”

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